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Loyola Core

The foundation of your experience.

A Loyola education is about learning to understand the world as it is, so that we can work to make it better. It focuses on the values that shape our lives, so that we can free ourselves from prejudice and unexamined views. It inspires us to act and reflect critically on our actions, as we seek the creation of a more just world. 


The Loyola Core is the foundation of our holistic curriculum, deeply grounded in Jesuit values and the liberal arts and sciences. It’s designed to build students of competence, conscience, and compassion—so that you’ll graduate not just with a full understanding of knowledge in your discipline, but also able to think critically, exercise self-awareness, and commit to a life of learning and service.

The goal of the Loyola Core is to foster your competency in five key areas:

  • critical thinking
  • effective communication
  • quantitative reasoning
  • information literacy
  • ethical reasoning

Be you, be true, be whole.

The Loyola Core embraces an interdisciplinary approach with an emphasis on the spiritual and intellectual, the moral and ethical, as well as the natural and social sciences, the humanities, and the arts. These elements are central to educating you as a whole person, and they're integral to sustaining our learning community, with a goal of serving the greater New Orleans community and the world. The Core is the very root of our Jesuit education, and our promise to develop our students as scholars, so you can go on and change the world.

First Year Experience

The Loyola experience starts day one.

The first day of the first semester, actually. Our First-Year Experience is an issues-based, cross-disciplinary program for all students, with a theme that ties together college-level thinking and learning, as well as the Jesuit values at the core of our curriculum.

The Common Curriculum

For students who began their undergraduate academic program at between fall 2013 and spring 2016, the Common Curriculum serves as the foundation of a Loyola education. While the same mission and purpose remain, the structure of this curriculum depends more on each student's major program. If you're still taking Common Curriculum requirements, consult your advisors if you have any questions about the different requirements between the Loyola Core and the Common Curriculum.