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History

 

A Rich Tradition

 

  • In 1847, seven Jesuit priests came to New Orleans with the hope of opening a Jesuit institution for higher-learning, and in 1884, Father O’Shanahan learned that a large plantation across from the park was available. He bought the land for $75,500, determined to establish the institution that the priests dreamed of.
  • In 1904, Loyola College opened its doors.
  • Loyola’s enrollment numbers grew quickly, and the college had to expand to accommodate them. In 1907, the Marquette Association for Higher Education was established, and 1910, this group was responsible for the building of Marquette Hall, the centerpiece of Loyola’s campus horseshoe.
  • On July 10th, 1912, the governor signed the act authorizing to change Loyola College to Loyola University.
  • Thomas Hall, a residence for the fathers, was dedicated in 1912.
  • The School of Law was established in 1914.
  • The New Orleans Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art was founded in 1919. It was incorporated into Loyola University in 1932 as the College of Music.
  • In 1947, the Department of Commerce expanded into the full-fledged College of Business Administration.
  • In 1964, Loyola completed major physical plant expansion with the dedication of three new buildings: a 404-student residence hall, a university center, and a central heating/cooling plant.
  • In 1967, Buddig Hall, a 412-student women’s residence, was dedicated.
  • In 1986, a 115-000-square-foot Communications/Music Building was dedicated.
  • The six-level Recreational Sports Complex was dedicated in February 1988.
  • In 1993, Loyola purchased Mercy Academy, which now houses the Office of Human Resources, the Office of International Student Affairs, and Physical Plant.
  • In 1996, Loyola officially changed its name to Loyola University New Orleans to distinguish itself from other Jesuit institutions with similar names.
  • The 150,000-square-foot J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library opened its doors in January 1999.
  • In 2007, the College of Law opened its Wendell H. and Anne B. Gauthier FamilyWing.
  • In 2011, the university completed a renovation and expansion of Thomas Hall to include Admissions, the Bursar’s Office, Student Records, Student Finance and Financial Aid.
  • The College of Law expanded its reach in 2011 with the renovation of the former Dominican Conference Center. It now houses the Stuart H. Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice.

The campus of Loyola continues to expand physically while becoming more involved in improving both the city of New Orleans and the State of Louisiana through its commitment to ministry and education.

Loyola University New Orleans is one of 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States. It is open to students of all faiths.