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Object Lessons: Loyola University New Orleans Center for Editing and Publishing Receives Additional Funding from the National Endowment for Humanities

By Loyola University on Thu, 08/22/2019 - 09:27

Object Lessons: Loyola University New Orleans Center for Editing and Publishing Receives Additional Funding from the National Endowment for Humanities

 (New Orleans –  August 21, 2019) Forty-four books into the internationally renowned Object Lessons series, the Center for Editing and Publishing and an English professor at Loyola University New Orleans will receive additional funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to continue their great work. 

The award-winning Object Lessons series, launched in 2015 by Loyola University New Orleans Dorothy Harrell Brown Distinguished Professor Dr. Chris Schaberg and co-editor Ian Bogost of Georgia Institute of Technology, can be found in some of the hippest book shops and museums around the world, from MOMA, LACMA and the International Spy Museum to the Louvre and Tate Modern.  Every day at Loyola University New Orleans, students help with the book selection and editing processes.

“As the authors work with me, they also work with my student assistants who correspond with the authors and manage all their materials,” said Schaberg, who says he couldn’t have launched this series from any other academic home. “Scholars, creatives, authors and writers across disciplines pitch their proposals and we review and discuss them, identifying opportunities and ultimately moving the books forward all the way from conception to production. Having Loyola students work with me side-by-side over the years has helped make the series what it is today.”
 
Bringing life to everyday items, Object Lessons is an essay and book series that explores the hidden lives of ordinary things. Published by Bloomsbury — the house that launched the best-selling Harry Potter series — and in partnership with the The Atlantic, the Object Lessons series invites contributors to develop original insights and lessons around any particular object. 

NPR named Dust, a book in the series, among the Best Books of 2016. And in 2017, Schaberg received a $250,000 Public Humanities grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the series and student internships, as well as help the writers to lead four writing institutes aimed at inspiring and encouraging scholars to write for wide audiences.

This week, Loyola received an additional $25,000 in NEH funding, which in part helps support student internships at Loyola, through which they gain excellent experience in the fields of publishing and editing. The Object Lessons series is a key experiential learning component of Loyola’s new Center for Editing & Publishing, Schaberg said.

“Our students are learning about the world of editing through publishing these books, and already a number of have gone on to work at major publishing houses, literary agencies, and online outlets,” Schaberg said.

The Object Lessons workshops were recently held up as a model of public humanities work in literary scholar Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s new book Generous Thinking: A Radical Approach to Saving the University. Dr. Schaberg’s book series will publish three new titles next month: Email, Hashtag, and Magnet.