World Civilization since 1650
Hist-T124-002
Spring 2003
Dr. Bernard Cook
Office: Bobet 427
Telephone: 2564
cook@loyno.edu

Office Hours:
MWF 8:15-9:15
MWF 12:30-1:20
MW 2:30-3:40
You are welcome to come by at other times as well.

This course will survey significant political, social, and economic developments from 1650 to the present. Goals: The student will know, understand, and be able to explain and discuss these developments, will write two lucid and coherent papers on assigned topics, and will be able to identify the principal countries of the world and their capitals.

Required reading: Greaves, Zaller, Cannistraro, Civilizations of the World: The Human Adventure, volume two, from the middle 1600s. Third Edition. If the bookstore sold you an earlier edition return it.

You will find the study guides for each chapter at <http://www.loyno.edu/~cook/GreavesStudyGuides.html>.
A list of additional potential essay questions will be distributed before each test.

Be sure to read the chapters on the days indicated on the syllabus. Read also any web site documents indicated for individual chapters. You will occasionally be asked to comment on the chapters and websites orally or in writing. You will be graded on the content of your paragraph and the clarity of your expression and your ability to relate the piece to the material in the chapter.

Papers: You will receive extra credit for any papers you hand in concerning the contents of the evening lectures. You will receive extra credit for submitting the summary and additional extra-credit based on the quality of your submission.
For the April 25 written assignment: Attach a title page. Write a reasoned reaction to the material making sufficient specific references to what you have read to indicate that you have read the material and read it intelligently. Do not include long quotes (over a line in length). Staple your paper on the top left hand corner. You will be graded on content, development, and expression.

Attendance: I require and expect punctual attendance. After the second absence your final grade will be lowered 6 points for each additional unexcused absence. The first two absences are counted whether excusable or not. I determine the validity of excuses. After 7 absences the student will receive an F. If the student exceeds the maximum number of allowed absences before the last day for an administrative withdrawal, the student may withdraw from the course in the normal way to avoid an F.

Students who arrive late disturb class. Class begins at 9:30. If you arrive after I have begun taking role, you are late. Late arrivals will be tolerated only in exceptional cases, and only one or two times. If you arrive late, you must offer your excuse after the class. If your excuse is acceptable to me, you will be counted present. If you are late, it is your responsibility to let me know after class that you were present. If you do not let me know immediately after class, the absence registered by your name will not be removed. The third time that a student arrives after class has begun that student is required to come to my office to offer an explanation or that late arrival and any subsequent late arrival will be counted as absences.

Students may leave class only for extraordinary reasons and must offer an explanation after class or they will be counted absent.

Make-ups: A rescheduled test, including map tests, will be given only in exceptional circumstances. You must notify me within 24 hours of the missed test, stating the reason for your absence. If in my opinion your excuse is acceptable, I will at that time schedule your make-up. It will be generally scheduled for the following day. My make-ups are as a rule more difficult than the scheduled tests. Recreational activity never constitutes a valid excuse.

Class Decorum: Talking, sleeping, reading, studying other material, listening to cassette players etc., eating or smoking during class will not be tolerated. These activities demonstrate a lack of seriousness and/or a lack of concern for others. Any student engaging in any of these activities will be asked to leave the room.

Cheating: Any cheating , including plagiarism, will be reported to the Dean and will result in an F in the course.

Tentative Schedule:

January
13 Introduction
14 For extra credit "Overcoming a Past of Terror? The Problem of
International Criminal Courts or National Truth and Reconciliation Commissions" 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm, Prof. Albert van Goudoever. Monroe Library Multimedia room 2. For extra credit hand in a typed page concerning the contents on January 15.
15 Read Chapter 21
For extra credit: "The Problem of the Universality of Human Rights: A
Continuous Debate since 1945," 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm, . Monroe Library Multimedia room 2. Prof. Albert van Goudoever. For extra credit hand in a typed page concerning the contents on January 17.
17 Read Chapter 22
20 Holiday.
22 Read Chapter 23.
24 Read Chapter 24.
27 Chapter 24.
29 Map of Europe; Read Chapter 25.
31 Read Chapter 27.
February
3 Chapter 27.
5 Read Chapter 26.
7 Read Chapter 28.
Read "The Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen"
< http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/rightsof.htm>
and "The Declaration of the Rights of Woman and Citizen"
<http://members.aol.com/agentmess/frenchrev/wmanright.html>
10 Read Chapter 28.
12 Read Chapter 29.
For extra credit: The Transition to Democracy in Bulgaria, Dr. Dimiter Minchev, Monroe Library Seminar Room #4, 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm. For extra credit hand in a typed page concerning the contents on February 14.
14 Read Chapter 30.
17 Read Chapter 31: Read "Life in the Factory" and the accounts of two "Factory Workers," <http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/IRchild.main.htm>.
19 Chapter 32.
21 Map of Asia.
24 Read chapter one of "The Communist Manifesto" <http://csf.Colorado.EDU/psn/marx/Archive/1848-CM/>
26 Test.
28 Read Chapter 33.
March
3 Holiday
5 Holiday
7 Chapter 33. Map of Latin America
10 Read Chapter 34.
12 Read Chapter 35.
14 Chapter 35.
17 Read Chapter 36 and Armenians in Turkey:
http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/genocide/armenians.htm
18 For extra credit: Ethnic Conflict and the Role of NATO in Macedonia, Dr. Dimiter Minchev, Monroe Library Seminar Room #4, 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm. For extra credit hand in a typed page concerning the contents on February 19.
19 Read Chapter 36.
21 Chapter 36.
24 Test
26 Read Chapter 37.
28 Chapter 37. Read Stalin's Forced Famine: http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/genocide/stalin.htm
31 Read Chapter 38.
April
2 Chapter 38: Read the Nazi Holocaust: http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/genocide/holocaust.htm
4 Chapter 38.
7 Read Chapter 39.
9 Chapter 39.
11 Read Chapter 43. Read Bosnia-Herzegovina: http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/genocide/bosnia.htm
14 Holiday
16 Holiday
18 Holiday
21 Holiday
23 Chapter 43.
25 Read Chapter 40. Study "The Wars for Vietnam:" http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/vietnam/index.html. Write a two-page paper in which you list what you believe are the six most crucial dates in the Vietnam War (1945-1975) and explain why you made the choices you did.
27 Chapter 40 continued. Read Pol Pot in Cambodia: http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/genocide/pol-pot.htm
30 Map of Africa. Read Rwanda 1994: http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/genocide/rwanda.htm
May
2 Read Chapter 41.
5 Chapter 42. Read Israel's War for Independence: http://www.megastories.com/mideast/wars/1948.htm
7 Chapter 42.

Exam: Saturday, May 10, 9 AM

Value of work:

Test 1......................................................................................................20%
Test 2......................................................................................................20%
Test 3......................................................................................................20%
Map of Africa..........................................................................................5%
Map of Asia.............................................................................................5%
Map of Europe ........................................................................................5%
Map of Latin America............................................................................2%
Indication that you have read the material for the day, including
quizzes on web sites………………….............................................10%
Paper...................................................................................................…..5%
Participation: You will loose points for each day missed but gain
points for answering questions on the chapters…………………..10%

Grading scale:
100-97=A+
96-94=A
93-90=A-
89-87=B+
86-84=B
83-80=B-
79-77=C+
76-74=C
73-70=C-
69-67=D+
66-64=D
63-60=D- This is a Common Curriculum Course.

Students with disabilities who wish to receive accommodations in this class should contact Disability Services at 865-2990 as soon as possible so that warranted accommodations can be implemented in a timely fashion. Disability Services are located in the Academic Enrichment Center, Monroe Hall 405.

Plagiarism

A word on plagiarism (cf. "Integrity of Scholarship and Grades" in the Undergraduate
Student Bulletin and the Student Handbook under the section "Behavior Inappropriate for a Loyola Student."):

1. Plagiarism: to steal and pass off the ideas or words of another as one's
own; to use a created production without crediting the source; to present as
new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.
2. When quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, or otherwise using the words
and/or ideas of another person, you must acknowledge that use with a
citation. Generally known facts (e.g., George Washington was the first U.
S. president elected under the Constitution of 1789) need not be footnoted.


First two study guides:

chapter 21

The first European country to establish itself in Africa:

Those in Africa who held land used it to hunt, fish, farm, or graze herds, not to speculate in the hope of amassing profits by purchasing and reselling
property. Black Africans produced to:

The religion of Ethiopia was:
Its variety was called:

In what Central African state did Christianity make significant inroads:

What was the impact of the development of the predatory economy upon North Africa?

What group introduced a significant change into African slavery?

The principal peoples of present day Nigeria:
1)
2)
3)
The language and culture which came to dominate the East Coast of Africa from Mogadishu to Kilwa:

Discuss African slavery.
Discuss the Transatlantic slave trade.
Discuss the impact of the slave trade on Africa

Chapter 22

Mandate of Heaven
Role of Eunuchs in Chinese Empire
Cheng Ho's Vovages:
Why was there no follow up?
"Middle Kingdom" (significance):
Basic Confucian message:
Describe the decline of the late Ming Empire: