Russia since 1905
Spring 2003
Dr. Bernard Cook
Office: Bobet 427
Telephone: 2564
cook@loyno.edu

Office Hours:
MWF 8:15-9:15
MWF 12:30-1:20
MW 2:30-3:40
You are welcome to come by at other times as well.

Required reading:

Suny, The Soviet Experiment.
You will be given reading assignments from Suny. You are expected to have read the assigned material and on the basis of this reading to be prepared to answer questions, to ask questions, and to discuss.

Solzhenitsyn, August 1914. Read, and write a three page reaction. Due February 14. At least two full double spaced typed pages. Attach a title page. Write a reasoned reaction to the material making sufficient specific references to what you have read to indicate that you have read the material and read it intelligently. Relate what you have read in this book to what you have learned about Forced Collectivization in Suny. Do not include long quotes (over a line in length). You will be graded on content, development, and expression.

Conquest. Harvest of Sorrow. Read, and write a three page reaction. Due March 7. Same instructions, but relate what you have read in this book to what you have learned about Stalin's Terror in Suny.

Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Read, and write a three page reaction. Due March 17. Same instructions, but relate what you have read in this book to what you have learned about Stalin's Terror in Suny.

Gall. Calamity in the Caucasus. Read, and write a three page reaction. Due April 25. Same instructions, but. take into consideration developments since August 1999 in Chechnya and Russia.

You might find these interesting:
Russia Chronology: <http://www.departments.bucknell.edu/russian/chrono.html>
Links to Russia: <http://www.aimnet.com/~ksyrah/ekskurs/russlink.html>
Maps: <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/Libs/PCL/Map_collection/commonwealth.html>
Map of St. Petersburg: <http://www.barnsdle.demon.co.uk/russ/rmaps.html>
Russian Revolution pages: <http://www.barnsdle.demon.co.uk/russ/rusrev.html>

Other Course Requirements:

I require and expect punctual attendance. After the third absence your final grade will be lowered six points for each additional unexcused absence. The first three absences are counted whether excusable or not. I determine the validity of excuses. On the seventh absence (except for very exceptional circumstances, of which I will be the judge) you will receive an F for the course.

Students who arrive late disturb class. It is better to come late than to miss class, but I expect an explanation for late arrival. Late arrivals will be tolerated only in exceptional cases, and only one or two times. If you arrive after the role has been taken, you must offer your excuse after the class. If your excuse is acceptable to me, you will be counted present. If you miss the roll, it is your responsibility to let me know after class that you were present. If you do not let me know immediately after class, the absence registered by your name will not be removed. The third time that a student arrives after class has begun that student is required to come to my office to offer an explanation or that and any subsequent late arrival will be counted as absences.

Students may leave class only for extraordinary reasons and must offer an explanation after class or they will be counted absent.

Make-up will only be given for reasons which I regard as serious. A rescheduled test will be given only if you notify me within 24 hours of the test, stating the reason for your absence. If I regard your excuse to be legitimate, I will at that time schedule a time for the make-up. Make-up tests as a rule will be more difficult than the original test.

Tentative Schedule:

January
13 Introduction
15 Peter the Great; Catherine II; Alexander I
17 Nicholas I; Alexander II
20 Holiday.
22 Alexander III; Nicholas II
24 Suny Ch. 1.
27 Film
29 World War I
31 Suny Ch. 2.
Review: Russian Revolution in Dates <http://www.barnsdle.demon.co.uk/russ/datesr.html>
Read: War and the Provisional Government
<http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/apr/13.htm>
Read: Notes in Defense of the April Theses
<http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/apr/12.htm>
February
3 Suny Ch. 3.
Review: Brest-Litovsk
<http://www.lib.byu.edu/~rdh/wwi/1918/brestlitovsk.html>
Read: Lenin's Hanging Order
<http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/SDG/Experimental/soviet.exhibit/ad2kula k. html>
5 Suny Ch. 4.
7 Suny Ch. 5.
Read: "Was Stalinism Implicit in the October Revolution?"
<http://www.barnsdle.demon.co.uk/russ/oct.html>
10 Suny Ch. 6.
12 Suny Ch. 7.
14 Solzhenitsyn, August 1914 due.
17 Continued.
19 Suny Ch. 8.
21 Suny Ch. 9.
24 Test.
26 Suny Ch. 10.
28 Suny Ch. 11.
March
3 Holiday
5 Holiday
7 One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich due.
10 Film
12 Film
14 Suny Ch. 12.
17 Harvest of Sorrow due.
19 Harvest of Sorrow.
21 Suny Ch. 13.
24 Suny Ch. 14.
26 Suny Ch. 15.
Read: "Yalta Agreement":
<http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/wwii/yalta.htm>
28 Suny Ch. 16-17.
31 Suny Ch. 18.
April
2 Suny Ch. 19.
4 Suny Ch. 20-21.
Read: Documents 1 and 6 from Documents from 1989:
<http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/news/19991105/index.html#docs>
7 Test.
9 Film
11 Film
14 Holiday
16 Holiday
18 Holiday
21 Holiday
23 Suny Ch. 22.
25 Chechnya
27 Chechnya
30 Film
May
2 Film
5 Discussion
7 Round-up

Exam: Wednesday, May 14, 11:30 AM

Value of work:

Test 1...............................................................................................15%
Test 2...............................................................................................15%
Exam.................................................................................................25%
Book Essays......................................................................................25%
Discussions of text; web sites; books, and films..............................20%

Grading scale:

100-90=A
89-87=B+
86-83=B
82-80=B-
79-77=C+
76-73=C
72-70=C-
69-67=D+
66-63=D
62-60=D-

Plagiarism

A word on plagiarism (cf. "Integrity of Scholarship and Grades" in the Undergraduate
Student Bulletin and the Student Handbook under the section "Behavior Inappropriate for a Loyola Student."):

1. Plagiarism: to steal and pass off the ideas or words of another as one's
own; to use a created production without crediting the source; to present as
new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.
2. When quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, or otherwise using the words
and/or ideas of another person, you must acknowledge that use with a
citation. Generally known facts (e.g., George Washington was the first U.
S. president elected under the Constitution of 1789) need not be footnoted.

Disabilities

Students with disabilities who wish to receive accommodations in this class should contact Disability Services at 865-2990 as soon as possible so that warranted accommodations can be implemented in a timely fashion. Disability Services are located in the Academic Enrichment Center, Monroe Hall 405.