Politics and Faith Meet

Fri, 09/01/2006

In his recent encyclical letter, Deus Caritas Est, Pope Benedict XVI sends a message on Christian love to all Catholics. I believe his message is appropriate for all believers and so Bread for the World in Louisiana is printing the following from Deus Caritas Est.

The Encyclical opens with these words; “God is love, and he who abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him” (1 Jn 4:16). These words from the First Letter of John express with remarkable clarity the heart of the Christian faith: the Christian image of God and the resulting image of humankind and its destiny. In the same verse, Saint John also offers a kind of summary of the Christian life: “We have come to know and to believe in the love God has for us.”

In Part II, The Practice of Love by the Church as a Community of Love, Article 28 Benedict XVI writes: In order to define more accurately the relationship between the necessary commitment to justice and the ministry of charity, two fundamental situations need to be considered.

POLITICS IS MORE THAN A MERE MECHANISM FOR DEFINING THE RULES OF PUBLIC LIFE: ITS ORIGIN AND ITS GOAL ARE FOUND IN JUSTICE.

The just ordering of society and the State is a central responsibility of politics. As Saint Augustine once said, a State which is not governed according to justice would be just a bunch of thieves. Fundamental to Christianity is the distinction between what belongs to Caesar and what belongs to God, in other words, the distinction between Church and State. The State may not impose religion, yet it must guarantee religious freedom and harmony between the followers of different religions. The Church, as the social expression of Christian faith, has a proper independence and is structured on the basis of her faith as a community which the State must recognize. The two spheres are distinct, yet always interrelated.

Justice is both the aim and the intrinsic criterion of all politics. Politics is more than a mere mechanism for defining the rules of public life: its origin and its goal are found in justice, which by its very nature has to do with ethics. The State must inevitably face the question of how justice can be achieved here and now. But this presupposes an even more radical question: what is justice? The problem is one of practical reason; but if reason is to be exercised properly, it must undergo constant purification, since it can never be completely free of the danger of a certain ethical blindness caused by the dazzling effect of power and special interests.

ITS AIM (FAITH) IS SIMPLY TO HELP PURIFY REASON AND TO CONTRIBUTE, HERE AND NOW, TO THE ACKNOWLEDGMENT AND ATTAINMENT OF WHAT IS JUST.

Here politics and faith meet. Faith by its specific nature is an encounter with the living God – an encounter opening up new horizons extending beyond the sphere of reason. But it is also a purifying force for reason itself. From God’s standpoint, faith liberates reason from its blind spots and therefore helps it to be ever more fully itself. Faith enables reason to do its work more effectively and to see its proper object more clearly. This is where Catholic social doctrine has its place: it has no intention of giving the Church power over the State.

Even less is it an attempt to impose on those who do not share the faith ways of thinking and modes of conduct proper to faith. Its aim is simply to help purify reason and to contribute, here and now, to the acknowledgment and attainment of what is just.

The Church’s social teaching argues on the basis of reason and natural law, namely, on the basis of what is in accord with the nature of every human being. It recognizes that it is not the Church’s responsibility to make this teaching prevail in political life. Rather, the Church wishes to help form consciences in political life and to stimulate greater insight into the authentic requirements of justice as well as greater readiness to act accordingly, even when this might involve conflict with situations of personal interest. Building a just social and civil order, wherein each person receives what is his or her due, is an essential task which every generation must take up anew. As a political task, this cannot be the Church’s immediate responsibility. Yet, since it is also a most important human responsibility, the Church is duty-bound to offer, through the purification of reason and through ethical formation, her own specific contribution towards understanding the requirements of justice and achieving them politically.

The Church cannot and must not take upon herself the political battle to bring about the most just society possible. The Church cannot and must not replace the State. Yet at the same time the Church cannot and must not remain on the sidelines in the fight for justice.

THE CHURCH CANNOT AND MUST NOT REMAIN ON THE SIDELINES IN THE FIGHT FOR JUSTICE.

The Church has to play its part through rational argument and has to reawaken the spiritual energy without which justice, which always demands sacrifice, cannot prevail and prosper. A just society must be the achievement of politics, not of the Church. Yet the promotion of justice through efforts to being about openness of mind and will to the demands of the common good is something which concerns the Church deeply.