Prospective Students and Families

Prospective Students FAQs:

1. Do I have to disclose my disability on my application to college?
2. Does Loyola have to provide me with all the accommodations I request?
3. May Loyola charge me for providing an accommodation? 
4. How do I find out what my rights are in college? 
5. How do disability services differ between high school and college?

Prospective Families FAQs:

1. What kind of housing options are there for my child with a disability? 
2. Does Loyola have a way to handle students with food allergies? 
3. Can we visit the ODS on our college tour?
4. My child has an IEP/504 Plan. Why isn't that good enough for college?

Prospective Students FAQs

1. Do I have to disclose my disability on my application to college?
No, but if you want the University to provide an academic accommodation, you must identify yourself as having a disability to the Office of Disability Services (ODS). Likewise, you should let the ODS know about your disability if you want to ensure that you are assigned to accessible facilities. In any event, your disclosure of a disability is always voluntary.

2. Does Loyola have to provide me with all the accommodations I request?
Loyola is not required to lower or substantially modify essential requirements of a course, to require accommodations that would fundamentally alter the nature of a program, or that would result in an undue financial or administrative burden to the University. Finally, Loyola does not have to provide personal attendants, individually prescribed devices, readers for personal use or study, or other devices or services of a personal nature, such as tutoring and typing.

ODS will review your request in light of the essential requirements for the relevant program. It is important to remember that Loyola is not required to lower or waive essential course requirements. If you request a specific academic accommodation, Loyola may offer that accommodation, or it may offer an equally effective alternative. ODS will work with you through an interactive process to identify an appropriate academic accommodations.

3. May Loyola charge me for providing an accommodations?
No, nor may it charge students with disabilities more for participating in its programs or activities than it charges students who do not have disabilities.

4. How do I find out what my rights are in college?
Loyola provides you this information in the admission packet. You can also go online to Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Dept. of Education’s page which provides access to the Federal law and regulations as well as some FAQ’s. You may also contact Loyola's Office of Disability Services (ODS) which can provide you information on Federal, state, local, and campus regulations.

5. How do disability services differ between high school and college?
Please see our IDEA-ADA Services Comparison Chart for more information.  

 

Prospective Families FAQs

1. What kind of housing options are there for my child with a disability?
Loyola provides housing options that are accessible to students with disabilities. It is very important to discuss your child’s needs with the Office of Disability Services (ODS) as soon as possible to ensure that any accommodations that might be necessary can be handled in a timely manner. ODS works closely with the Office of Residential Life to ensure students' needs are reasonably accommodated.

2. Does Loyola have a way to handle students with food allergies?
This is another important issue that you should discuss with ODS as soon as possible to ensure that your child’s needs can be met under the meal plan. Loyola's food services on campus are contracted out to a private company and while this does not release Loyola from its obligations under a meal plan, it involves a process of informing appropriate officials of your child’s needs and implementing appropriate accommodations. ODS has experience and knowledge with this and can assist your child.

3. Can we visit the ODS on our college tour?
ODS would love for you to visit us and learn about our services and procedures and meet our staff. We encourage prospective parents and students to make an appointment if you have a specific time you would like to visit us so we can ensure that we are in the office and available to answer your questions.

4. My child has an IEP/504 Plan. Why isn’t that good enough for college?
An IEP or 504 Plan addresses your child’s needs only in the K-12 educational program. Postsecondary education is a totally different arena. Almost everything about the postsecondary system is different from what you’ve experienced before. This includes how a college may address your child’s needs for accessing its educational program and the information it needs to accomplish this. While the IEP or 504 Plan may provide the ODS with some of the information it will need, additional information may be required.