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The Loyola University New Orleans College of Law’s Incubator Program Continues to Expand

Loyola press release - March 28, 2017

The Loyola University New Orleans College of Law is pleased to announce that its Incubator Program accepted the largest cohort of attorneys yet, welcoming seven highly qualified candidates in January 2017. The attorneys are practicing in diverse areas of law including Family Law, Civil Rights, Estate Planning, Criminal Law, Personal Injury and Employment Discrimination.

The College of Law’s Incubator Program is an intensive two-year mentorship and skills program for recent College of Law graduates who are engaged in solo law practice. The Program provides free office space to program attorneys in the Stuart H. Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice at the College of Law, along with free skills and CLE courses including training on law practice management. Program attorneys also receive access to mentorship, peer feedback, and case referrals.

Joining the program in January 2017 are Loyola law alumni Serena Birch, ‘16, Courtney Hollier Guillory ’16, Andrew Lifsey ‘16, John Love Norris, IV ‘13, Emily Ratner ‘13, Mauricio Sierra ‘13, and Matt Smith, ‘15. Three returning program attorneys, Angela Davis ‘13, Emily Posner ‘13, and Rachel Silvers ‘13, have already completed a year in the program.

“We are extremely pleased with the growing interest in our program among our recent graduates. This year’s applicant pool was the biggest ever and we are excited to work with these talented young lawyers,” said Judson Mitchell, Clinic Professor and the Incubator Program’s Acting Director.

The Incubator Program graduated three of its original cohort members in December 2016. Jonah Freedman, Nadia Madary, and Lori Noto left the program with successful, self-sustaining law practices.

“I never would have dreamt about opening my own practice without the mentorship, funding, collaboration with suite mates, and beautiful office space that the Loyola Incubator Program provided,” said Noto.

The Incubator Program includes a pro bono requirement where program attorneys spend a quarter of their time on pro bono legal services to help low and moderate means residents of the greater New Orleans community access legal services. The pro bono requirement has been a tool for providing critical legal services to those who cannot otherwise afford attorneys. Incubator Program attorneys have contributed over 4,300 pro bono hours since the program’s inception.

“Some may see service work as helping others, but my belief is that it fosters internal growth no matter what type of volunteer work it may be. For this reason, the most incredible benefit the program provides is the nurturing environment from which one can experience different types of cases through pro bono legal work,” said Freedman.

For more information about the Loyola Incubator Program including biographies of all program attorneys, visit www.loyno.edu/lawclinic/incubator-program or contact Judson Mitchell, clinic professor and acting director, at 504-861-5597.