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Loyola University New Orleans Named a “Best” Business School by the Princeton Review

Loyola press release - November 1, 2017

Loyola University New Orleans Joseph A. Butts, S.J. College of Business is an outstanding business school, according to The Princeton Review. The education services company profiles the school in its online feature, 2018 annual business school rankings.

According to Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior VP-Publisher, “We recommend Loyola University New Orleans College of Business as one of the best to earn an MBA. We chose the 267 on-campus MBA programs schools on this list based on our high regard for their academics and our assessment of institutional data we collect from the schools. We also solicited and greatly respect the opinions of 23,000 students attending these schools who reported on their experiences at their schools on our 80-question student survey."

The Princeton Review’s on-campus MBA survey asked students at the 267 b-schools about their school's academics, student body, and campus life as well as about themselves and their career plans. The online student surveys that were used for this edition were conducted in the 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17 academic years.

The Princeton Review’s business school profiles have sections on academics, student life, admissions information and graduates’ employment data. The profiles also have five categories of ratings that The Princeton Review tallies based on institutional data it collected during the 2016-17 academic year and/or its on-campus MBA student survey. Rating categories are: Academic Experience, Admissions Selectivity, Career, Professors Interesting, and Professors Accessible. The ratings are scores on a scale of 60 to 99. Among the impressive ratings in the Loyola profile are scores of 91 for Academic Experience; 94 for Professors Interesting, and 96 for Professors Accessible.

“Above all, our MBA program teaches critical thinking. Our students get out into their field, and they’re not just regurgitating facts,” said Ashley Francis, director of Loyola University New Orleans’ MBA program. “They know how to make decisions. Because they’ve already gotten the experience here. When our students and professors come together, it’s one of the greatest think tanks in the city. They’re doing real work for real clients, and they’re pushing each other forward. This program is tough, but when you start, you join a community of ambitious professionals who are going to push you along rather than leave you behind. You join a team."

Some of the comments from students attending Loyola University New Orleans College of Business are, according to The Princeton Review:

• Loyola’s “small, flexible MBA program” “really caters to each and every student,” a fact appreciated by the predominantly part-time student body in the College of Business' graduate programs.

• MBAs here also love the “Jesuit tradition,” which encourages “involvement in the New Orleans community.”

• “I appreciate being at a place that not only educates my mind, but gives me social awareness as well,” one student writes.

• Loyola professors “are very involved with the students. The classes are small and the faculty care about the students’ wellbeing and learning.”

• One student writes, “I was shocked to learn how easily accessible my professors were. They really are interested in your education and your life and they want you to succeed! In fact, they will put in extra hours to make sure you do just that. The business school here is more like a family, which makes it that much easier to learn.”

• Administrators are “excellent.” Indeed, the administration seems intent on exploring all opportunities to improve the program.

• “The quality and experience of the new students has improved each year as admission standards have become tougher,” MBAs here report approvingly.

The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. The Princeton Review is headquartered in New York, NY. The company is not affiliated with Princeton University. For more information, visit www.PrincetonReview.com.