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Loyola University New Orleans Hosts 22nd Student Film Festival

Loyola press release - May 5, 2016

Loyola’s new digital filmmaking program spends time in the spotlight.

Ready, set, action! Loyola’s 22nd Student Film Festival will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 11 in Nunemaker Auditorium on the uptown main campus. Twenty-five finalist films will be selected for screening on the state-of-the-art film projection system in the newly renovated auditorium, located in Monroe Hall. The event is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served. Audience participation is a must, and competition is steep.

The first set of independent films from first-year students in the University’s new undergraduate digital filmmaking degree program promises to reflect a diverse a group of interests and subject matter ― and impressive range of skills. Officially launched in September, the university’s new Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Filmmaking degree program has a strong business component and teaches craft skills needed on a Hollywood set.

“The level of professionalism has jumped exponentially since the film majors came on board,” says Grammy-nominated film director Jim Gabour, who directs the program. “And we look forward to even more exciting work as more new students arrive in Fall 2016.”

The films, which run six to 12 minutes in length, will be preceded by a 15-minute showcase of animated shorts created by Motion Design + Narrative students, to be unspooled from 12:45 to 1 p.m. in the same location.

Audience members will be given scorecards to allow them to grade the 25 films in competition, and the average score from those viewers will determine the grade each film receives. Audience members only have to grade four films for their ballots to count.

Loyola’s Digital Filmmaking Program is presented by the Department of Film & Music Industry Studies and the College of Music & Fine Arts. Animated shorts will be presented by students studying Motion Design + Narrative I and II courses taught by Daniela Marx, chair of Loyola’s new Design Department. Both include a service learning component.

In Motion Design + Narrative I, students learned how to animate a story and design for two audiences, French and English, child and adult, by working with second graders from the International School of Louisiana. In keeping with the Jesuit ideal ‘with and for others,’ students in the advanced course also worked with The International School, learning to collaborate with clients and “design for good.”