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Yale Law Professor delivers talk on incarceration, isolation and the courts

Loyola press release - January 21, 2016

Top legal expert will address Fall 2014 report on numbers of people and conditions in restrictive housing nationwide.

A Yale law professor visits Loyola University New Orleans College of Law next week to deliver a lecture on incarceration, isolation and the courts. Renowned legal expert Judith Resnik will deliver “Incarceration, Isolation and The Courts” as part of Loyola College of Law’s Judge Robert A. Ainsworth Jr. Memorial Lecture Series. The talk runs from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 in Room 308 at the Loyola College of Law, Broadway campus, located at 526 Pine St.

“The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world, and Louisiana leads all of the other states in the number of persons it incarcerates.” said M. Isabel Medina, Loyola’s Ferris Family Distinguished Professor of Law. “The law school is delighted to host Judith Resnik to help the law school and local community reflect on this phenomena. Professor Resnik will discuss research conducted by the Liman Program focusing in part on conditions in American prisons. The lecture is open and free to the public.”

Resnik is the Arthur Liman Professor of Law at Yale Law School, where she teaches about federalism, procedure, courts, prisons, equality, and citizenship. She is the founding director of the Arthur Liman Program, supporting fellowships for law graduates and summer fellowships at six colleges, and sponsoring colloquia on the civil and criminal justice systems.

In 2015, the Liman Program joined the Association of State Correctional Administrators in co-authoring Time-in-Cell: The Liman-ASCA 2014 National Survey of Administrative Segregation in Prison. The report is the first to provide updated information, as of fall 2014, on both the numbers of people and the conditions in restrictive housing nationwide.

Resnik’s books include: Representing Justice: Invention, Controversy, and Rights in City-States and Democratic Courtrooms (co-authored with Dennis Curtis, 2011), and Migrations and Mobilities: Citizenship, Borders, and Gender (co-edited with Seyla Benhabib, 2009). She co-edited with Linda Greenhouse the Daedalus volume The Invention of Courts, published in 2014. Recent articles include: Diffusing Disputes: The Public in the Private of Arbitration, the Private in Courts, and the Erasure of Rights (Yale Law Journal, 2015).

Resnik is a member of the American Philosophical Society, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a managerial trustee of the International Association of Women Judges. She has received the Margaret Brent Women Lawyers of Achievement Award from the Commission on Women of the American Bar Association; the Outstanding Scholar of the Year Award from the Fellows of the American Bar Foundation; and the Arabella Babb Mansfield Award from the National Association of Women Lawyers.

Resnik is also an occasional litigator. In 2009, she argued Mohawk Industries, Inc. v. Carpenter in the United States Supreme Court. Resnik has testified before Congress, before rulemaking committees of the federal judiciary, and before the House of Commons of Canada.

The late Honorable Robert A. Ainsworth, Jr. was a graduate of Loyola’s law school. Friends and admirers of Judge Ainsworth endowed a lecture series inviting distinguished speakers to appear at the College of Law. Ainsworth both served as a judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana and as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.