Welcome to the Loyola University Newsroom

Print this page

Loyola University New Orleans Collins C. Diboll Gallery hosts two new art exhibits

Loyola press release - September 23, 2015

Art show and reception spotlight New Orleans-based artists Rachel Jones Deris and Lee Deigaard.

The Collins C. Diboll Gallery and Visual Arts Center at Loyola University New Orleans welcomes two new exhibits by well-known New Orleans-based artists.

“Rachel Jones Deris: Specters” and “Lee Deigaard: Hippocamp and Delta” will be on display from Tuesday, Sept. 29 through Thursday, Oct. 22 at the Colin C. Diboll Gallery and Visual Arts Center at the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library at Loyola, 6363 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, La. 70118. Gallery hours are Monday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sundays from noon to 6 p.m. Admission to the gallery is free.

The exhibits ― a collection of new paintings by Rachel Jones Deris and a collection of drawings and photogenic drawings by artist Lee Deigaard that explore circulatory systems, landscape, and structures of the brain ― will be unveiled at an art reception that runs from 5 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 29, The event is free and open to the public. Both artists will attend.

“This show, like all art exhibitions, contributes to the cultural economy of our community. New Orleans in particular is a thriving creative community. This exhibition highlights two local artists who are respected on a national and international level,” said Karoline Schleh, gallery director and assistant professor visual arts at Loyola. “These are two really wonderful artists in our community. Both are highly trained artists and have received several high honors, and each explores the landscape in a thoughtful and engaging way in these complimentary exhibitions.”

Deris, a native of Antlers, Okla., has worked and taught in New Orleans since 2005 and shown her work extensively, with exhibitions in New Orleans, Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Florida, Texas, Oklahoma, and Austria. In 2009, shes was invited to mount a two-person exhibition at the New Orleans Museum of Art. Her work is part of that museum’s permanent collection, as well as many other private collections. Her work has been reviewed in many national publications, including ArtForum, Art Papers, the New Orleans Art Review, and TimeOut Chicago.

Deigaard has lived and worked in New Orleans since 2002. Trained as a sculptor, she works in a variety of media including photography, installation, drawing, and video. She graduated from Yale University with a major in fine arts and earned graduate degrees from the University of Michigan School of Art and Design and from the University of Texas at Austin, where she held a Michener Fellowship in Creative Writing. Recurring themes in her work include: animal protagonists, cross-species interactions and connections, ancient trees, bayous, the aftermath of the Gulf oil spill, and neural networks.

Deigaard was a 2009 recipient of the Louisiana Division of the Arts Artist Fellowship and a 2009-10 artist-in-residence at Louisiana ArtWorks. She is a member of the artist collective The Front. In 2012, Deigaard’s video installation won the Clarence John Laughlin Award for photography administered by the New Orleans Photo Alliance and First Prize at the Southern Open at the Acadiana Center for the Arts. Her memorial to Topsy the Elephant is on permanent display at the Coney Island Museum in Brooklyn, N.Y.

In 2013, she held solo shows at the Alexandria Museum of Art, the Acadiana Center for the Arts, the Contemporary Arts Center, and the University of New Orleans. Her solo show of photography, “Trespass” opened at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in January 2014 along with her video installation, “PULSE.”

For more information, contact Patricia M. Murret, Associate Director of Public Affairs, pmurret@loyno.edu, at
(504) 861-5448.

Loyola University New Orleans is a Catholic, Jesuit university located in the heart of the picturesque Uptown neighborhood of New Orleans. For more than 100 years, Loyola has helped shape the lives of its students, as well as the history of the city and the world, through educating men and women in the Jesuit traditions of academic excellence and service to others. Loyola’s more than 40,000 graduates serve as catalysts for change in their communities as they exemplify the comprehensive, values-laden education received from Loyola.