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'Spotlight on Justice' exhibit shares history of locals working for a more just world

Loyola press release - February 6, 2015

Throughout its history, Loyola University New Orleans has encouraged its students and faculty to embrace the Jesuits' core mission of working for a more just world. And, through the years, Loyola students and faculty have often taken a stand against what they perceived to be social injustices. Loyola's J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library will exemplify this spirit with an exhibit from the University's Special Collections and Archives.

The exhibit, “Spotlight on Social Justice,” which runs Feb. 2 through May 29, will encompass three separate displays and draw from collections donated by community members who are active in social justice issues in New Orleans.

The Rosemary Drown Archdiocese of New Orleans and School Integration Collection details the New Orleans Archdiocese's intent to end segregation in parochial schools, and the fierce response from local opposition groups. The New Orleans Social Justice and Activism Collection consists of materials related to social justice issues in and around New Orleans and Latin America from the mid-1980s to early 1991, including protests against David Duke. The K. Brad Ott Papers consist of materials chronicling the production and distribution of Ott’s self-published publications covering community activism and social justice activities in New Orleans and Louisiana for more than 20 years. This material includes a selection of publications centered on anti-nuclear and anti-war consciousness raising in the 1980s and early 1990s.

According to Digital Initiatives Librarian Elizabeth Kelly, the exhibits will include archival photographs of local protests, newspaper articles and literature intended to raise awareness of these issues.

For more information, contact Kelly at ejkelly@loyno.edu.