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The Princeton Review ranks Loyola's diversity, community relations and student newspaper among top 10 in nation

Loyola press release - August 11, 2014

Loyola University New Orleans was named one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduate education, according to The Princeton Review’s 2015 edition of its annual college guide, “The Best 379 Colleges.” Among The Princeton Review’s accolades, Loyola is ranked in the top 10 in the nation for its race-class interaction and diversity, No. 2, best college newspaper, No. 5, and is ranked No. 6 for town-gown relations, which gauges how well students get along with members of the local community.

Loyola is also ranked among the top 20 colleges in the nation for the easiest campus to get around, No. 16, and the best quality of life, No. 16. The rankings were tallied based on the data from The Princeton Review’s surveys of 130,000 students at the 379 schools in the book.

“Once again as evident in The Princeton Review’s rankings, Loyola University New Orleans is one of the top universities in America that celebrates diversity and places a high value on our students’ engagement within our community of greater New Orleans,” said Loyola President Kevin Wm. Wildes, S.J., Ph.D. “These ratings reinforce what makes a Loyola education special and point to the university’s continued commitment to enhancing the outstanding academic and student experience we offer.”

New for Loyola this year is the national ranking for its student newspaper, The Maroon. “This has been a stellar year for the Loyola School of Mass Communication. For The Maroon to be named one of the top college newspapers in the country is another testament to the quality of education that students are receiving at Loyola,” said Sonya F. Duhé, Ph.D., Loyola professor and director of the School of Mass Communication.

The accolade for The Maroon is the most recent in a long line of awards and recognitions for journalism education at Loyola. The School of Mass Communication recently garnered two historic accreditations to become the first Jesuit university program in the U.S. to hold national accreditations from both the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications and the Public Relations Society of America’s Certification in Education for Public Relations. The school is also the only such university program in Louisiana to hold both national endorsements.

“The entrepreneurial spirit of our journalism program is on full display as we continue to win numerous local, regional and national awards, including recognition for the innovation of The Maroon Multimedia Newsroom,” Duhé said. The Maroon Multimedia Newsroom, the latest example of new educational practices at Loyola’s School of Mass Communication, is outfitted with high-tech TV cameras, a news desk, green screen and the ability to link with local and national news outlets.

Loyola joins a select group of schools recognized by The Princeton Review this year; only about 15 percent of America’s 2,500 four-year colleges and only four colleges outside the U.S. are profiled in the book, which is The Princeton Review's flagship college guide. It includes detailed profiles of the colleges with rating scores for all schools in eight categories, plus ranking lists of top 20 schools in the book in 62 categories based on The Princeton Review’s surveys.

“Loyola University New Orleans offers outstanding academics, which is the chief reason we selected it for the book. We base our choices primarily on data we obtain in our annual surveys of administrators at these schools and at hundreds of other colleges. We take into account input we get from our staff, our 27-member National College Counselor Advisory Board, our personal visits to schools, and the sizable amount of feedback we get from our surveys of students attending these schools,” said Rob Franek, Princeton Review's senior VP/publisher and author of “The Best 379 Colleges.”