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Undergraduate philosophy conference hosts philosopher Alphonso Lingis

Loyola press release - November 16, 2009

Philosopher, artist, anthropologist and author Alphonso Lingis, will speak at Loyola University New Orleans in a lecture, "Violence and Splendor," on Saturday, Nov. 21 at 5:30 p.m., in Nunemaker Auditorium, located on the third floor of Monroe Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

The lecture is part of the "Reflections on Practical Philosophy" undergraduate philosophy conference hosted by Loyola, Tulane University, the Loyola chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, the Biever Lecture Series and the Loyola Student Government Association.

The talk will be based on Lingis’ latest book, "Violence and Splendor," which details how to understand collective performances, with examples drawn from the Rio de Janeiro Carnaval and the Mount Hagen Show in Papua.

Lingis attended Loyola University Chicago and pursued graduate study at the University of Leuven in Belgium. Upon returning to the United States, Lingis joined the faculty at Duquesne University and quickly gained a reputation as a preeminent English translator of noted philosophers Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Emmanuel Levinas.

In the mid-1960s he began work at Pennsylvania State University, where he published numerous scholarly articles on the history of philosophy. His debut as a book author came in 1982, with "Excesses." Lingis has had wide success as a public lecturer due both to his captivating style of writing and the performance art atmosphere of his lectures. During public talks he generally appears in costume or speaks amidst strange background music or recorded screams, often in total darkness. Throughout his years at Penn State, he was well known for welcoming students to his unusual home filled with rare birds, dangerous fish and insects and numerous third world artifacts.

Lingis, a professor emeritus of philosophy at Pennsylvania State University, is the author of numerous books including "Excesses: Eros and Culture," "Libido: The French Existential Theories," "Phenomenological Explanations," "The First Person Singular" and "Violence and Splendor." His books have been translated into French and Turkish, among other languages.

For more information, contact John Clark, professor of philosophy at Loyola University New Orleans, at clark@loyno.edu or call 504-865-2790.