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Loyola learning communities encourage personal, academic growth

Loyola press release - January 5, 2009

Loyola University New Orleans hosts a number of learning communities, in which students can choose to live and learn together. Currently, there are four communities and plans for three more in the 2009-2010 school year.

The Office of Residential Life provides four individual floors in Buddig Hall for groups of like-minded students to live and learn together in programs that intentionally combine academic departments, faculty and staff and cultural events to enhance their college experience.

The International Experience Learning Community is comprised of 20 students from all over the world, who are committed to facilitating intercultural understanding and communication. Students participate in a variety of academic, cultural and social programs on campus and in the New Orleans area.

The Wellness Learning Community brings together 20 students who sign the “Wellness Community Contract” to keep their environment free of drugs, alcohol and tobacco and learn the skills to hold themselves and their neighbors accountable to that commitment.

The Cardoner Fellows Learning Community is a highly selective two-year placement for 20 incoming freshmen, which helps to develop their personal leadership styles and support them through the first two years of college. The fellows, who commit to live in the community for two years, create a code of conduct by which they govern their community, and they take academic leadership classes.

The fellows also attend programs on and off campus that support their academic pursuits, and they choose a social issue or concern for the community to collectively address.

“Cardoner has been a great chance for me to get out and meet some people in the community,” resident Sean Hood said. “Not only is it a wonderful leadership opportunity, but it is a chance for a group of hard working freshman to enact change.”

The Honors Living Community is designed to support Honors students who choose to live with their peers and work closely with Honors faculty to design programs that enhance their social interactions and augment their coursework. The Honors Learning Community is open to 40 students.

Alex Thomas, a freshman, views his membership in the Honors Living Community as a privilege.

“My experience has been truly enjoyable, and I would seriously recommend that anyone who has the chance to take advantage of such an opportunity do so,” Thomas said.

Loyola is in the process of developing Faith and Justice, Psychology and Womens’ Issues communities for the next school year. Each of those communities will host 20 students.

To learn more about the Cardoner Fellows Leaning Community, contact Jessica Murphy at jdmurphy@loyno.edu. For the Honors Learning Community, contact Dr. John Sebastian at jtsebast@loyno.edu. For all other learning communities, contact Regan Sidney in the Office of Residential Life at rgsidney@loyno.edu.

Loyola University New Orleans hosts a number of learning communities, in which students can choose to live and learn together. Currently, there are four communities and plans for three more in the 2009-2010 school year.

The Office of Residential Life provides four individual floors in Buddig Hall for groups of like-minded students to live and learn together in programs that intentionally combine academic departments, faculty and staff and cultural events to enhance their college experience.

The International Experience Learning Community is comprised of 20 students from all over the world, who are committed to facilitating intercultural understanding and communication. Students participate in a variety of academic, cultural and social programs on campus and in the New Orleans area.

The Wellness Learning Community brings together 20 students who sign the “Wellness Community Contract” to keep their environment free of drugs, alcohol and tobacco and learn the skills to hold themselves and their neighbors accountable to that commitment.

The Cardoner Fellows Learning Community is a highly selective two-year placement for 20 incoming freshmen, which helps to develop their personal leadership styles and support them through the first two years of college. The fellows, who commit to live in the community for two years, create a code of conduct by which they govern their community, and they take academic leadership classes.

The fellows also attend programs on and off campus that support their academic pursuits, and they choose a social issue or concern for the community to collectively address.

“Cardoner has been a great chance for me to get out and meet some people in the community,” resident Sean Hood said. “Not only is it a wonderful leadership opportunity, but it is a chance for a group of hard working freshman to enact change.”

The Honors Living Community is designed to support Honors students who choose to live with their peers and work closely with Honors faculty to design programs that enhance their social interactions and augment their coursework. The Honors Learning Community is open to 40 students.

Alex Thomas, a freshman, views his membership in the Honors Living Community as a privilege.

“My experience has been truly enjoyable, and I would seriously recommend that anyone who has the chance to take advantage of such an opportunity do so,” Thomas said.

Loyola is in the process of developing Faith and Justice, Psychology and Womens’ Issues communities for the next school year. Each of those communities will host 20 students.

To learn more about the Cardoner Fellows Leaning Community, contact Jessica Murphy at jdmurphy@loyno.edu. For the Honors Learning Community, contact Dr. John Sebastian at jtsebast@loyno.edu. For all other learning communities, contact Regan Sidney in the Office of Residential Life at rgsidney@loyno.edu.