Welcome to the Loyola University Newsroom

Print this page

Chemistry professor and students to present at national meeting

Loyola press release - July 17, 2007

(New Orleans)—Loyola University New Orleans professor Kurt R. Birdwhistell, Ph.D., and several students will present two projects at the 234rd American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting, in Boston, MA, August 19-23, 2007.

Kurt R. Birdwhistell, Ph.D., Earl and Gertrude Vicknair professor of chemistry and the department of chemistry chair, Andy Nguyen, HN’07, and Robert Kobelja, biochemistry/pre-med senior, will present “Acylation of ferrocene: A greener approach” on Sunday, August 19, at 7:30 p.m. and Monday, August 20 at 8 p.m.

Birdwhistell, Laura Thomas, biochemistry/pre-med senior, Eric J. Ramos, HN’07, and Christa Simmers, forensic chemistry junior, will present, “Loyola University green chemistry outreach program,” on Monday, August 20, at 8:30 a.m. Thomas, who is the ACS student affiliate president for next year, will give the presentation.

Birdwhistell joined Loyola in 1988 and has served as the chair of the chemistry department since 1996. He is an avid researcher and has written many scientific and educational articles and given many professional presentations. He has obtained funding for his research from various national funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Research Corporation, and Petroleum Research Fund. Birdwhistell received his Ph.D., from the University of North Carolina, and his bachelor’s of science from University of West Florida.

The students and graduates involved with the presentations are or were all part of the Student Affiliate of American Chemical Society (SAACS), an organization of chemistry majors and other majors that use green chemistry principles in outreach programs within Loyola and the New Orleans community. Any modification of an existing organic process that removes environmentally harmful solvents or reagents, reduces waste, or involves recycling of materials can be considered a green adaptation.

The American Chemical Society is the world’s largest scientific society. It is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals, and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.