Welcome to the Loyola University Newsroom

Print this page

Communications professor S.L. Alexander interviews Bebe Moore Campbell

Loyola press release - July 7, 2005

Communications Professor S.L.Alexander, Ph.D., will interview author Bebe Moore Campbell, Sunday, July 10, 9 a.m., on WRBH-FM 88.3.

Campbell has authored three New York Times bestsellers, Brothers and Sisters, Singing in the Comeback Choir, and What You Owe Me, as well as Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine (a New York Times notable book of the year and winner of the NAACP Image Award for Literature) and her memoir, Sweet Summer, Growing Up With and Without My Dad. Campbell has also written a non-fiction book, Successful Women, Angry Men: Backlash in the Two-Career Marriage, and numerous essays and articles.

Campbell has worked as a journalist for The New York Times Magazine, Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times and many other notable publications and is also a regular commentator for National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition.”

Campbell is a member of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill and a founding member of NAMI-Inglewood. Her interest in mental health lead her to write her first children’s book, Sometimes My Mommy Gets Angry (2003), which tells the story of a little girl who must cope with being raised by her mentally ill mother.

A native of Philadelphia, Campbell received a bachelor of arts in elementary education from the University of Pittsburgh. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two children.

Miami native S.L. Alexander has devoted 30 years to writing, radio, TV, and law. Her latest book, Media and American Courts: A Reference Handbook was part of the ABC Clio series on Contemporary World Issues, is an up-to-date reference guide for scholars, journalists and students of law, journalism, political science and communications, as well as for members of the general public who are interested in the topic of media coverage in the courts.

Alexander’s earlier books include Covering the Courts: A Handbook for Journalists, (rev 2003). She served as the first Brechner Fellow in Freedom of Information at the University of Florida before coming to Loyola University in 1991. She has written extensively on freedom of information issues including access to judicial process, a subject on which she is nationally recognized for her expertise.