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Loyola University New Orleans holds spring 2004 commencement ceremonies

Loyola press release - April 20, 2004

The Loyola University New Orleans community will hold its commencement ceremonies Thursday-Saturday, May 13-15, 2004, at the university’s Uptown campus. The rain site for the commencement ceremonies is the Recreational Sports Complex.

Baccalaureate Mass

The university-wide Baccalaureate Mass begins at 7 p.m., on Thursday, May 13, in the Marquette Horseshoe.

Commencement Ceremonies

The School of Law Commencement Ceremony will begin at 7 p.m., on Friday, May 14, in the Marquette Horseshoe. Marcel Garsaud, A54, L’59, former law dean and current professor, will receive an honorary doctor of laws degree and give the commencement address.

After graduating from Loyola School of Law, Garsaud practiced law in the private sector with Standard Oil Company. In 1967, he completed his education with a graduate degree in law from Yale University. Garsaud’s distinguished teaching and administrative career at Loyola began in 1963. He was then and still is one of the most respected members of this faculty. As dean from 1970-82, he led Loyola’s ascent in the ranks of national law schools. Under his leadership, a new building was constructed to house the law program on the main campus. He recruited a superb faculty that shared his commitment to academic excellence, justice, and service. As a result, the quality of the student body continued to improve and the reputation of the law school continued to grow. For more than forty years he has served Loyola generously and well.

The College of Arts and Sciences Commencement Ceremony will be held at

9 a.m., on Saturday, May 15, in the Marquette Horseshoe. The Hon. John Breaux, U.S. Senator (D-La.) will receive an honorary degree and give commencement remarks. Internationally renowned sculptor Lin Emery also will receive an honorary degree.

Born in Crowley, Louisiana, Breaux was elected to the House of Representatives in 1972 at the age of 28. At the time of his election, he was the youngest member in the U.S. Congress. He represented the 7th District of Louisiana for 14 years before filling the seat in the United States Senate vacated by Russell Long in 1986. In 1998, Breaux was re-elected to a third term in the U.S. Senate, receiving an endorsement from every major newspaper in the state. Breaux’s mainstream approach to government has earned him praise from conservatives, liberals and moderates across the state. He has been a leader on critical issues facing Louisiana, strongly supporting the agriculture, oil and gas, and tourism industries. Breaux has balanced a strong economic agenda with environmental action to secure fund to preserve America’s wetlands. He is a graduate of the University of Southwestern Louisiana and the LSU School of Law in Baton Rouge.

Few artists have made such significant contributions to the arts community internationally and locally, as has Lin Emery. Her work has been exhibited worldwide and yet she has played a vital role in the local New Orleans arts community. Emery’s passion for sculpture began in 1950. While studying French history at the Sorbonne, she volunteered as an assistant to the famed Russian sculptor, Ossip Zadkine. Her early creations included traditional figures for church commissions and modernist fountains. In the 1970s she began creating the kinetic sculptures that would bring her international acclaim. Emery is well known for blending the high polish and modular construction of minimalist sculpture with the organic beauty of natural forms. Monumental-scale examples of her shimmering, kinetic works can be found in public parks and corporate lobbies as far away as Japan.

The College of Music, College of Business Administration, and City College Commencement Ceremony will begin at 7 p.m., on Saturday, May 15, in the Marquette Horseshoe. Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu will deliver the commencement remarks. Metropolitan Opera star Charles Anthony, M’52, will receive an honorary degree.

Landrieu is a 1985 graduate of Loyola School of Law. His 2003 run for lieutenant governor was his first bid for statewide public office. In 1987, he was elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives where he served for 16 years in the seat previously held by his sister, U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, and his father, Moon. As a state representative, Landrieu was responsible for a number of meaningful reforms in a variety of areas. He led the legislative effort to reform Louisianan’s juvenile justice system with a focus on rehabilitation. Landrieu led the effort by a coalition of artists, venue owners, and other interested parties who were successful in repealing the Orleans Parish “amusement tax,” a 2 percent tax on gross sales at any establishment that features live music. Landrieu also crafted legislation to fund the Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium of New Orleans, a partnership between the LSU and Tulane health sciences centers. He has been a practicing attorney for 15 years and is the fifth of Moon and Verna Landrieu’s nine children. After graduating from Jesuit High School in 1978, he received a degree in political science and theatre from Catholic University in Washington, D.C.

Charles Anthony was recently honored at the New York Metropolitan Opera as “The Soul of the Opera,” for his 50 years of tenure as a tenor. Loyola’s College of Music shares this sentiment about one of its most successful graduates who has become a well-respected figure in the professional world of opera.

Born in 1929 to Sicilian immigrants in New Orleans, Calogero Antonio (Charles Anthony) Caruso began performing with the New Orleans Opera House Association chorus as a young teen in the mid-1940s. In 1952, at age 22, he decided to participate in the Metropolitan Opera’s Auditions of the Air and won first place. With his prize money, he went to Italy, the birthplace of the art, for two years of further study. In 1954, the Metropolitan offered Anthony a debut as the Innocent in Boris Godounov.

In addition to performances on the Met’s stage at Lincoln Center, Anthony has participated in the company’s parks concert series, and in its tours of the United States, Europe, and Japan. On February 17, 1992, Anthony completed his 2,396th performance with the Met in the company’s production of Rigoletto. With this role, he broke the record for most performances with the Metropolitan Opera, a record that had stood since 1966. On March 6, 2004, celebrated his 50th anniversary with the Met.

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