Welcome to the Loyola University Newsroom

Print this page

Loyola University New Orleans School of Law receives $375,000 from the Louisiana Outside Counsel Health and Ethics Foundation

Loyola press release - June 10, 2002

(New Orleans)—Loyola University New Orleans School of Law will receive a $375,000 gift from the Louisiana Outside Counsel Health and Ethics Foundation (LOCHEF). Donations will be paid over 20 years and support the establishment of an endowed professorship in legal ethics.

The funds are made possible through the 1998, $206 billion settlement reached between plaintiff states and major tobacco companies. Thirteen Louisiana and four out-of-state law firms represented the state of Louisiana in the dispute. Louisiana's share of the settlement is $4.6 billion. The 17 law firms created LOCHEF as a vehicle for distributing donations to a variety of organizations in the state. LOCHEF will give Loyola $60,000 this year, $60,000 in 2006, $60,000 in 2010, $15,000 in 2012, $90,000 in 2014, and $90,000 in 2018.

Law alumni Michael X. St. Martin, a 1967 graduate and former member of the Board of Trustees; Morton H. Katz, 1969 graduate; Kenneth E. Badon, 1971 graduate; Ken Carter, 1978 graduate; and 1984 graduate Conrad S. Williams, III, were lead attorneys for the state.

Law Dean James Klebba said the funds would help to "build our endowment and expand our ability to prepare a new generation of attorneys. One way in which we can train students for zealous advocacy is to not only give them an appreciation for and knowledge of the law, but to instill in them an ethical and moral compass. I thank the members of the Louisiana Outside Counsel Health and Ethics Foundation for their foresight and generosity in helping to enhance our legal ethics program."

"It is vitally important that young attorneys have ethics training to understand and maintain the high standards in the legal field," St. Martin emphasized. "I hope that the training provided at Loyola will prevent future breaches of these standards due to a lack of knowledge about professionalism."

"Our long-term commitment to Loyola by virtue of this gift is in recognition of the university's commitment to high standards in education and the profession of law," added Carter.

Founded in 1914, the Loyola School of Law operates both a day program for full-time students and evening program for part-time students with a total enrollment of approximately 700. The law faculty numbers 32 full-time members. The law school is a member of the Association of American Law Schools and is accredited by the American Bar Association.