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Loyola University New Orleans to Host Gaston Lecture

Loyola press release - February 14, 2002

(New Orleans)óDr. Philip J. Hefner will speak at the Gerald N. Gaston Lecture in Science & Religion at Loyola University New Orleans on Thursday, March 7, 2002 at 7:30 p.m. The lecture will be held in Nunemaker Auditorium, located on the third floor of Monroe Hall. Hefner's lecture is titled "God's Created Co-Creator: Interpreting Science, Technology, and Theology." The lecture is free and open to the public.

Hefner is an ordained minister for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. He is a Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology at the Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago, Ill., where he also serves as Director of the Zygon Center for Religion and Science. The Center provides a place of research and discussion between scientists, theologians, and other scholars and is dedicated to relating religious traditions and scientific knowledge in order to gain insight into the origins, nature, and future of humans and their environment. Hefner is the editor-in-chief of Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science.

His published writings includes six books and more than 150 scholarly articles, dealing with religion and the natural sciences as well as traditional historical and theological issues. He received the Templeton Best Books in Religion-and-Science-Award for The Human Factor: Evolution, Culture, Religion in 1993.

Hefner recently represented his church by serving on the dialogue commission between the Lutheran World Federation and the World Alliance of Reformed Churches and as a member of the U.S.A. Lutheran-Reformed Coordinating Committee. Having taught throughout the United States, Europe, Africa, and Asia, Hefner has attempted to balance a concern for the theology of the Christian tradition, and of Lutheranism, with attention to contemporary culture, particularly the arts and the natural sciences.

Based on the heritage of Catholic higher education in Louisiana since 1849, Loyola University New Orleans was chartered in 1912. Today, the university serves approximately 5,550 undergraduate and graduate students. The university is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

For more information on this lecture, contact the Office of Public Affairs at 861-5888.