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Loyola Law Review Presents Symposium on Critical Issues In Civil Law

Loyola press release - October 21, 2002

The Loyola Law Review presents a symposium on critical issues in the civil law featuring Michael McAuley of the Louisiana State University Law Center. Professor McAuley will present a lecture entitled, “Lessons of Recodification: An Invitation for the People of Louisiana” on Tuesday, October 29, 2002 at 4:30 p.m., at the Loyola University School of Law in room 112.

Michael McAuley is the Clarence W. Edwards Associate Professor of Law at Louisiana State University Law Center. Before joining the Law Center at LSU, McAuley was a senior trust attorney at Appleby Spurling & Kempe in Bermuda. He also practiced law in Montreal and London and currently is vice chair of the International Bar Association Discrimination & Gender Equality Committee. McAuley previously served as chair of the International Business Association’s Individual Tax and Estate Planning Committee from 1994-1998.

Professor McAuley will address the issues involved in recodifying Louisian’s law. Codification as a method of lawmaking has a long history in Louisiana. Current revision of the 1870 code began in 1976. It continues to this day with no end in sight. Yet, the process of the 19th century codification (and revision of that codification) as a particular way of creating and proclaiming the private legal order is out of date. It is no longer the best device for securing active involvement of the citizenry. A new way of imagining and imaging law, electronically and visually, together with a clear written expression of legal rules, should be the stuff of a 21st century civil code.

Professor McAuley will explain why recodification must be collaborative and why the public must be encouraged to make and discuss the law.

Based on the heritage of Catholic Jesuit higher education in Louisiana since 1849, Loyola University New Orleans was chartered in 1912. The Loyola School of Law operates both a day program for full-time students and an evening program for part-time students with a total enrollment of approximately 650 students and 30 full-time faculty members. The law school is a member of the Association of American Law Schools and is accredited by the American Bar Association. Visit Loyola University New Orleans on the World Wide Web at http://www.loyno.edu.

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