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Loyola University New Orleans invites community to "Take Back The Night"

Loyola press release - September 23, 1998

(New Orleans)—Loyola University New Orleans sponsors the eighth annual "Take Back the Night" march on Wednesday, October 21, beginning in the Loyola University horseshoe on St. Charles Avenue at 7 p.m.

The march is a call to end sexual violence in the community and in society. It is also a powerful healing ritual for survivors of violence and for the men who care about them.

Originally named "Women Take Back the Night," the event was designed primarily to heighten awareness of sexual violence against women and to empower female survivors. The current name change is to raise awareness that sexual violence is perpetrated against men as well as women and to empower all survivors.

The emotionally powerful evening includes speakers who share their personal stories of rape, assault, domestic violence, and their journeys to healing. Candles are lit by survivors of violence and carried into the crowd to light participants’ candles. This provides a visual image of the large number of people whose lives have been impacted by violence.

The march route proceeds from Loyola up St. Charles Avenue to Broadway, turning onto Freret Street and ending in Tulane’s Pocket Park. Here others will have the opportunity to speak out against violence in our community. Musical accompaniment will be provided again by Robyn E. T-shirts and buttons will be available at Pocket Park all day on October 21.

The "Take Back the Night" march is open to the entire community–both men and women, survivors and supporters. The event is sponsored by Loyola and Tulane universities.

For more information, please contact Dr. Cecilia Sun in Loyola University’s Counseling and Career Services Center at 865-3835.

Based on the heritage of Catholic Jesuit higher education in Louisiana since 1849, Loyola University New Orleans was chartered in 1912. Today, the university serves approximately 5,500 undergraduate and graduate students. The university is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern association of Colleges and Schools.