Publications + Reports

Institute staff and collaborators disseminate their research and analysis and education on Institute core issues of race, poverty, and migration, their interconnections, and Catholic Social Teaching through a variety of publications and reports:

The JustSouth E-News is published in months in which our JustSouth Quarterly is not published, usually six to seven times a year. It usually includes articles by the staff, links to new reports and releases from regional and national sources on race, poverty, and migration, upcoming Institute events, and occasional “action alerts” about pressing social policy matters. View archives »

The JustSouth Quarterly is the principle journal for in-depth research and writing of the Institute staff and collaborators. It reflects our research, analysis and education, as well as content from our periodic conferences and events. View archives »

In addition, the Institute publishes occasional issue papers, the texts of addresses by the staff and colleagues, and JSRI conference documents as free-standing reports to supplement our regular publications. View archives »

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Quarterly: In Praise of Newcomers

A major criticism leveled against recent newcomers to the United States is that they are “takers” creating an economic drain on the nation. Not only are they takers, critics lament, but also categorically “illegal,” echoing past racist associations of criminality with African-Americans and many other people of color.

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Quarterly: Taxing the Poor

A number of governors are seeking to eliminate state personal and corporate income taxes and substitute higher sales taxes. To assess the impact and morality of these proposed changes, one needs to look first at the current state-local tax burdens of state populations.

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E-Newsletter: Ash Wednesday Execution

DeSoto District Judge Robert Burgess set an execution date for Christopher Sepulvado for Ash Wednesday, February 13, 2013.  Sepulvado, 69, has served twenty years on death row at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola.

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E-Newsletter: The Dynamism of Catholic Social Teaching in the Pursuit of the Common Good

Dr. Mikulich discusses the fundamental principles of Catholic social thought and their application to current election issues.

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E-Newsletter: Who Cares about the Broken World?

Fr. Fred Kammer highlights the key role of the Vatican II document on The Church in the Modern World at the Council and up to the present.

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E-Newsletter: Brennan Center for Justice updates its Voting Rights map

The Brennan Center for Justice at New York University recently updated its Voting Rights and Laws map.

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E-Newsletter: Catholic theologians and experts call for protecting "Endangered Common Good"

JSRI Fellow Alex Mikulich signed “On All of Our Shoulders: A Catholic Call to Protect the Endangered Common Good,” along with over 150 Catholic theologians, academics, and ministers.

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E-Newsletter: The High Cost, Low Return of Longer Prison Terms

The length of time served in prison has increased markedly over the last two decades, according to a new study by Pew's Public Safety Performance Project. Prisoners released in 2009 served an average of nine additional months in custody, or 36 percent longer, than offenders released in 1990.


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Quarterly: Changing the Script: A Starting Point for Reducing Gun Violence

In the last issue of JustSouth Quarterly, my article, “Stop Casting Stones: The Failure of Punitive Crime Policy,” focused on what does not work in criminal policing. A key point to remember about the failure of punitive crime policy is that getting “tough on crime,” through more arrests, more incarceration, harsher sentences, and imposition of the death penalty contribute to a “vicious cycle” of violence itself.

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E-Newsletter: The Central Place of Race in Crime and Justice

In her 2011 Sutherland Address to the American Society of Criminology, Ruth D. Peterson argued that a comprehensive approach to understanding race and racial disparities in crime and justice is necessary.

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