Publications + Reports

Institute staff and collaborators disseminate their research and analysis and education on Institute core issues of race, poverty, and migration, their interconnections, and Catholic Social Teaching through a variety of publications and reports:

The JustSouth E-News is published in months in which our JustSouth Quarterly is not published, usually six to seven times a year. It usually includes articles by the staff, links to new reports and releases from regional and national sources on race, poverty, and migration, upcoming Institute events, and occasional “action alerts” about pressing social policy matters. View archives »

The JustSouth Quarterly is the principle journal for in-depth research and writing of the Institute staff and collaborators. It reflects our research, analysis and education, as well as content from our periodic conferences and events. View archives »

In addition, the Institute publishes occasional issue papers, the texts of addresses by the staff and colleagues, and JSRI conference documents as free-standing reports to supplement our regular publications. View archives »

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E-Newsletter: Is Amnesty a Dirty Word?

Louisiana chooses amnesia over amnesty.

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E-Newsletter: Refusing to Expand Medicaid: Political Decisions with Deadly Consequences

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) had three major provisions to promote expanded health coverage to Americans: a mandate for employers with fifty or more full-time employees to provide health insurance; an individual mandate to purchase insurance (with federal subsidies to assist families with incomes below 400% of the federal poverty level); and expansion of Medicaid coverage to all individuals with incomes at or below 138% of the federal poverty level.  (138% of the federal poverty line is now $16,105 per year for an individual or $27,310 for a family of three.) 

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E-Newsletter: "We Belong to Each Other": Forgetting Our Oneness at a Town Hall Meeting

In late August last year, two months after the U.S. Senate had passed a bipartisan immigration reform bill, I attended a Town Hall meeting called by Congressman Steve Scalise. 

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E-Newsletter: Why Lynch Italians?

Throughout the history of our country newcomers have been vilified as dangerous others—less than human. As the New Orleans community honors its Italian heritage this weekend it is an opportune time to reflect—have we learned from the mistakes of our collective past?

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E-Newsletter: Won't raising the minimum wage cost jobs?

The minimum wage debate is hot. The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2013 (FMWA) would raise the minimum from $7.25 to $10.10 over three years and then index to inflation. Why? 

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Quarterly: Honduran Agony

In mid- September, JSRI Associate Mary Baudouin joined a U.S. Jesuit Conference delegation for a week of traveling across Honduras to learn about the political and social problems confronting that Central American country of 8.3 million people. 

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E-Newsletter: Martin Luther King, Jr.: Becoming maladjusted for the beloved community

Dr. Alex Mikulich reminds us of the call of Dr. King to resist systemic and structural injustice in all its forms. 

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Quarterly: Where are the Jobs?

While the stock market is soaring to set new records and CEOs are taking home cash and stock options, high rates of unemployment remain. The “official” unemployment rate for April 2013 was 7.5 percent, representing 11.7 million persons, of whom 4.4 million have been unemployed for at least six months.

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Quarterly: Border Visions and Immigration Reform

Migration theologian Fr. Daniel Groody suggests that the U.S.-Mexico border is more than an imaginary dividing line between two countries. Rather, a complex history and conflicting prerogatives have resulted in a border between “national security and human insecurity, sovereign rights and human rights, civil law and natural law, and citizenship and discipleship.”

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Quarterly: In Praise of Newcomers

A major criticism leveled against recent newcomers to the United States is that they are “takers” creating an economic drain on the nation. Not only are they takers, critics lament, but also categorically “illegal,” echoing past racist associations of criminality with African-Americans and many other people of color.

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